April 12, 0216

Don’s Dynamite – A tale of two cities

A tale of two cities

The people have spoken but it appears in almost silent tones.

We have a new Mayor – Councillor Loft. The former mayor is now apparently weighing up his future with a consultancy being his preferred option according to local media.

So what are our future prospects under the new Mayor? For those of us who have been residents of the region for lengthy periods, we’ve seen all this before. So the short answer is that only time will tell.

So whether or not the new Mayor follows through with his promises will be something which the ratepayers will no doubt take a keen interest in and be vocal about if history is anything to guide us.

The interesting statistic to come out of the voter trends for the mayoral race were that voters in Maryborough overwhelmingly supported the new Mayor whilst the former mayor garnered much of his support from the voters of Hervey Bay. It appears that the rivalry between the two cities is alive and well so the mayoral race was really the tale of two cities.

It is worth pointing out that the new Mayor received 33.22% of the primary vote while the former mayor a little less at 30.87% of the primary vote. Hardly a resounding endorsement for the new Mayor particularly when you consider the endorsement Jack Dempsey [Bundaberg Mayor elect] received from his constituents. Put another way, something like 2 out of 3 ratepayers who voted did not want the new Mayor of the former mayor as their first choice.

Hardly a resounding endorsement for the new Mayor particularly when you consider the endorsement Jack Dempsey [Bundaberg Mayor elect] received from his constituents. Put another way, something like 2 out of 3 ratepayers who voted did not want the new Mayor of the former mayor as their first choice.

So let’s turn to the Councillors elected to govern the region.

If you take out James Hansen (88.15% of the primary vote) and George Seymour (elected unopposed ) then only Rolf Light actually received more than half the votes (52.60% of the primary vote).

Others elected received a vote ranging from 32% to 46% of the primary vote. This can be interpreted in most cases as being that the majority of the voters didn’t really fancy a particular candidate.

So in essence, the new council starts without the majority support of the voters in most Divisions.

So what does the future really hold for the voters/ratepayers of the region? Is it more of ‘we get the elected representatives we deserve’ or ‘the more thing change the more they remain the same’? Well let’s hope not. Let’s just hope that the new council recognises that positivity, consultation and the need to meet the reasonable expectations of the people are the paramount considerations when determining council processes.